Messy Color™ French Blue

511505 - Sold Out

French Blue (511505)<br />An opaque blue.

An opaque blue.




See how French Blue fits into the 104 color palette. Read more and see more comparison beads including etched versions at Lush Blogs. – Julie Fountain

Click here for other interesting French Blue discoveries.

 
Messy French Blue
Joy Davidson Randrup
French Blue, Unique Creamsicle -2, and Peace
Darlene Collette
Messy French Blue
Dianna Trout
Messy French Blue
Joy Munshower
Messy French Blue
Jolene Wolfe
Messy French Blue
JC Herrell

Messy Tester's Feedback

  • Our testers report that French Blue and Effetre dark periwinkle are basically equivalent colors.
  • Messy Color testers have described French Blue as everything from “not at all streaky” to “wonderfully streaky” depending on the size of the bead. The larger you work, the more likely you are to see streaks.
"Can go a bit swirly if both not heated enough, or heated too much, see bottle's body.” – Elasia
  • Testers reported that French Blue is somewhat reactive.
"I had some different shades show up in dots as I worked with a larger bicone.” – Dianna Trout
"French Blue gets the darker blue line on it around things like frit or other colors, which I like." – Evil Glass
  • French Blue is slightly more intense when etched.
“Etching seems to intensify the color.” – Tim Gottleber
“It is streaky and becomes more apparent when etched.” – Janice Laster
  • Special thanks to Elasia, Evil Glass, Claire Morris, Genea Crivello-Knable & Gail Witt for providing the photos in this section.

Visit the CiM Resource Page on the Kitbitz Art Glass site.
See Kay Powell’s frit testing samples.
Browse Serena Thomas’ color gallery.
Check out Miriam Steger’s CiM color charts.


"The glass I have used in Point Break is CiM French Blue, CiM Hades, Effetre Cobalt Lapis, Reichenbach Multicolor and a medley of blues in the ribbon cane." Read more at Kitzbitz Art Glass' blog.
Jolene Wolfe
"I decided to make a set of beads out of plain, un-encased Effetre Turquoise and then I decorated them with some fine scrolly stringerwork in CiM French Blue." Read more at Laura's blog.
Laura Sparling
French Blue with super clear and white. See more of Chris's French Blue beads.
Chris Sanderson
Chris Sanderson tested French Blue & light turquoise. See more test beads on Chris's blog.
Chris Sanderson
"Note how French Blue has a clear reaction to the silver wire." Read more at Darlene's blog.
Darlene Collette
"French Blue is significantly darker than regular Periwinkle and it’s much better with silver wire. I can't use Periwinkle with silver wire as it fumes too badly, no problem with French Blue."
Julie Fountain
See how French Blue fits into the 104 color palette. Read more and see more comparison beads including etched versions at Lush Blogs.
Julie Fountain
"It's not the nastiest reduction I've seen - and I could even maybe see a use for blue-black beads. You don't seem to be able to get it to go away though - once it's there - it's there for good. These four beads were made from right to left, turning down the gas with each one." Read more at DragonJools blog.
Dwyn Tomlinson