Messy Color™ Sakura Ltd Run

511906 - Sold Out

Sakura Ltd Run (511906)<br />A transparent pink.

A transparent pink.




“A transparent sister to CiM's Phoenix, Sakura was used in a multitude of tests such as encasing over fine silver [shown here]. Variations in the color due to application were each delightful in themselves. A deep bronze emerged when encased over fine silver. Upon encasing, the glass retained more of its initial pink hue.” – Heather Sellers

Click here for other interesting Sakura Ltd Run discoveries.

 
Bottom part is Chamomile, top part is Sakura over Periwinkle and Bubblegum
Sarah Hornik
Sakura
Gloria Sevey
Sakura & Frozen
Jolene Wolfe
Messy Sakura base with a frit blend called Sakura
Karla Lester-Repperger
Sakura
Amy Hall
Messy Sakura
Kandice Seeber

Messy Tester's Feedback

  • Sakura was engineered in response to requests for a dense transparent pink.
Sakura etches to a 'light pastel' instead of a 'very faint tint.' All the other pinks on the market are so pale that they have very little color when etched, and if you put them over anything only the faintest tint shows. I would describe Sakura as a rich peachy rose, stronger in color than your other pinks, a perfect pastel. And a truly unique color, I have never seen that hue of pink in any 104 glass. – Celia Friedman
Sakura is a medium blush pink with bronze undertones. In a side-by-side comparison to Effetre 046 and Vetrofond 068, Sakura's intensity is quite noticeable. – Heather Sellers
  • Sakura is difficult to photograph accurately.
Sakura is hard to photograph accurately. The pink tones of the glass seem to disappear, and a strong orange color takes over, sometimes with bright orange highlights. Curiously, the color doesn't vary much to the naked eye, based upon lighting, unlike some other things you sell. It's only in photographs that it turns orange like that. – Celia Friedman
  • Special thanks to Heather Sellers, Amy Hall, Karla Lester-Repperger, & Celia Friedman for providing the photos in this section.

Visit the CiM Resource Page on the Kitbitz Art Glass site.
See Kay Powell’s frit testing samples.
Browse Serena Thomas’ color gallery.
Check out Miriam Steger’s CiM color charts.


"I had created these beads and noticed that when it was paired with silver infused glass, the pink seemed to take on a peachy pink cast. I love discovering new reactions when working with silver glass. The base pink glass is Sakura and the silver highlight dots are Double Helix Aurae." Read more at Darlene's blog.
Darlene Collette
"For retaining that pretty pink, the white core is your best bet. The pink layered over the periwinkle gives you a lovely shade of purple that is hard to get otherwise. [Photos shot in studio lighting - colours more intense, makes it easier to see the differences]." Read more at DragonJools blog.
Dwyn Tomlinson
Karla and Melissa's frit blend called Sakura on a base of Messy Sakura.
Karla Lester-Repperger
"I’m going to say it: it reminds me of tinned pink salmon. Like several of the CiM pinks, Sakura has an orangeness to it which is where the salmon vibes are coming from, I think." Read more of Laura's testing.
Laura Sparling
"I found the more the glass is worked in the heat, the increase in orange tones. When I encased it without contact to tools, the pink blush remained."
Heather Sellers
"When I first saw this color, I thought it was just a medium pink transparent - but when I looked closer and when I melted the rod, I got a glorious shade that sits somewhere between peach and pink. It's much more saturated than either the Vetrofond or the Effetre version of light transparent pink. I would call it a kind of pale cantaloupe color. . . . . this glass doesn't seem to bubble or scum at all, and stays perfectly flawless when melted." Read more at Kandice's blog.
Kandice Seeber
“A transparent sister to CiM's Phoenix, Sakura was used in a multitude of tests such as encasing over fine silver [shown here]. Variations in the color due to application were each delightful in themselves. A deep bronze emerged when encased over fine silver. Upon encasing, the glass retained more of its initial pink hue.”
Heather Sellers