Messy Color™ Buttermilk Ltd Run

511315 -

Buttermilk Ltd Run (511315)<br />A creamy opaque ivory.

A creamy opaque ivory.




"Buttermilk is a lovely neutral color. The bead on the left has a small wrap of Double Helix Terra which was reduced just a bit. The Terra didn’t react with the base color except to fume it just a tad. The middle bead was marvered with a cold tool and the color changed to a very pale, slightly yellowish ivory. The bead on the right is Buttermilk all on its own." – Gloria Sevey

Click here for other interesting Buttermilk Ltd Run discoveries.

 
CiM Buttermilk
Kandice Seeber
CiM Buttermilk, Canoe, Harvest, Monarch
Darlene Collette
CiM Buttermilk with Chrysalis
Caroline Davis
includes CiM Buttermilk
Melanie Graham

Messy Tester's Feedback

  • Buttermilk was engineered in response to requests for Cake Batter [now sold out] or a similar pale opaque yellow.
"Buttermilk is so pale you might almost mistake it for white until you put it next to white. Then you can see the creamy yellow undertones. It's kind of like an eggshell with just a tiny hint of yellow if you strike it right." Read more at Kandice's blog. – Kandice Seeber
"When testing, I had in mind that this color might be a close replacement for Cake Batter, but it isn't in my opinion. Cake Batter is quite a bit more yellow, yet still a cream tone." – Renee Wiggins
  • Special thanks to Caroline Davis for providing the photo in this section.

Visit the CiM Resource Page on the Kitbitz Art Glass site.
See Kay Powell’s frit testing samples.
Browse Serena Thomas’ color gallery.
Check out Miriam Steger’s CiM color charts.


"Buttermilk can be fumed with silver leaf, shown here with this tiny goddess bead. The darker areas are where the silver leaf has been burnished on to the bead and vapourised in the flame to leave small caramel tan areas of colour behind." Read more at Kitzbitz Art Glass's blog.
Jolene Wolfe
"Buttermilk is an attempt to re-make Cake Batter. I think that is a more neutral shade, and, in fact, may be the non-reactive ivory you've been looking for. I haven't been looking for it, I like the reaction, but it is nice to have the option! . . . . CiM classifies this with the yellows, but for me - it is in the neutral family." Read more at DragonJools blog.
Dwyn Tomlinson
"Buttermilk is a neutral opaque 'cream' color, very similar to Bone, but without the darker off-white blushes. It is ever so slightly more yellow than pure white. Buttermilk is a shade darker than pure white [the teeth in the example are made with Effetre White for reference.] Melts great, I had no issues at all with bubbling or boiling."
Renee Wiggins
"Buttermilk is pretty well-behaved, but will spread a little bit if you don't cover it completely and carefully. It's not too stiff, but not at all soupy like other pale opaque cream colors tend to be. It also wasn't shocky, which was really nice." Read more at Kandice's blog.
Kandice Seeber
"Buttermilk is a very pale yellow or light ivory, it is not as reactive as Painted Hills. It is a more creamy yellow than Cake Batter. It looks more yellow when used as a stringer over nonreactive glass, and has a more mustard tinge when used with silver glass."
Caroline Davis
Left to right:
Cake Batter, Buttermilk, Painted Hills
Claudia Eidenbenz
"Buttermilk is a very pale, opaque yellow. It strikes in the flame, blushing a little more yellow as you work it, but doesn't darken significantly. The consistency of it is beautiful, and my rods of Buttermilk were not shocky. Like Bone, this colour fills a gap in my palette that has been open since Vetrofond stopped making us nice pale neutrals. . . . On the whole, this colour is not very reactive and I found it to be quite stable." Read more at Melanie's blog.
Melanie Graham
"Buttermilk is a lovely neutral color. The bead on the left has a small wrap of Double Helix Terra which was reduced just a bit. The Terra didn’t react with the base color except to fume it just a tad. The middle bead was marvered with a cold tool and the color changed to a very pale, slightly yellowish ivory. The bead on the right is Buttermilk all on its own."
Gloria Sevey
Left to right:
Effetre opal yellow, Buttermilk, Effetre ivory
Claudia Eidenbenz
Left to right:
Painted Hills, Cake Batter, Buttermilk
Claudia Eidenbenz
"Bone and Buttermilk look quite similar. These colours were dipped into a frit blend containing Blue Chalcedony [note that these were not in the flame long, and did not go in the kiln]."
Trudi Doherty
"I made beads with bands of Dark Multicolour, silvered ivory and Rubino. Neither Bone nor Buttermilk show any sign of reaction ... which I love! But what is more noticeable in the beads is that the Buttermilk has struck to a pale primrose yellow."
Trudi Doherty
"Buttermilk is a warm opaque cream. The glass is as smooth as its name through the beadroller, yet holds crisp detail nicely. When compared with Bone, Buttermilk is a warm, creamy ivory. When paired with silver reactive glass, Buttermilk doesn’t develop the strong line of demarcation unlike Effetre Light Ivory." Read more at Heather's blog.
Heather Sellers