Messy Color™ Arctic Misty Ltd Run

511592 -

Arctic Misty Ltd Run (511592)<br />A misty opal light blue.

A misty opal light blue.




"Arctic Misty melted on the murky greeny blue side whereas Milky was a cleaner pretty opal aquamarine. A slight colour shift occurred [more so to Misty] after kiln annealing. They both melted fine in the flame and not shocky at all." – Bianca Gruber

Click here for other interesting Arctic Misty Ltd Run discoveries.

 
CiM Arctic Misty
Anna Miller
CiM Arctic Misty & Milky
Olga Ivashina
CiM Arctic Misty with DH Psyche & Zephyr
Darlene Collette

CiM Tester Feedback

  • Testers reported that Arctic Misty color shifts. The only testers who were able to retain the blue color worked quickly & small. Longer working times or adding silver resulted in the darker olive grey color.
  • Special thanks to Claudia Eidenbenz & Bianca Gruber for the photos in this section.

Join Trudi Doherty's FB group Lampwork Colour Resource Sharing Information for a catalogue of color study.
Claudia Eidenbenz’s "Vetrothek" (glass library) is a great resource for color comparisons.
See Kay Powell’s frit testing samples.
Browse Serena Thomas’ color gallery.
Check out Miriam Steger’s CiM color charts.
Consult Jolene Wolfe's glass testing resource page.


"This glorious light aqua color changed to moss green. During flame time, some parts remained blue. Once annealed, it all turned moss green."
Anna Miller
"Arctic, top misty, bottom milky. It was going along fine with the misty, and just as I was about to put it in the kiln, I noticed that the body looked scorched. I have no idea what happened. I don't know if this was me or something that this color does. The milky version was no problem."
Dwyn Tomlinson
"Other CiM testers had varying success with keeping the blue tones in their test beads so I was prepared for a surprise opening my kiln the next morning. I paired Arctic Misty with Double Helix Psyche glass shaping these flat backed tapered barrels. The Psyche glass was twisted and reduced and encased with DH Zephyr. The colors going into the kiln were blues and blues. What came out was a dark bottle green-brown. Was I disappointed? Certainly not as I had planned for it. Thank you my CiM Testing team as you allowed me to 'make lemonade out of a lemon.'  I think these beads are beautiful and the darker base glass really allowed the silver glass to appear more vibrant. The spacer beads are Arctic Misty with no silver glass added." Read more at Darlene's blog.
Darlene Collette
"Arctic Misty and Arctic Milky are a beautiful blue in rod form. I am not really sure what to describe them as worked. An odd greenish brown? While working, everything looked okay. A bit of odd color was visible going into the kiln, more so with the Misty version. The glass itself worked beautifully. No problems there. I decided to go small and quick and made birdie pairs. Top row is just before going into the kiln. Bottom row, after. Again, not what I expected. I figured the small size and quick working would take care of the color change. I was wrong. The birdies were the last thing made for the day. I garage at 925⁰ for two hours past the last bead in. I don't know if cooling in a fiber blanket then batch annealing would work."
Chris Haussler
“The lovely pale turquoise rods are spike to my lover-of-all blues heart. Imagine my shock when I opened my kiln to find this mossy brownish green glass! I had no clue that this would happen while I was using it, it went into the kiln blue with no hints of the final colour. Now, if you are a lover-of-all greens, this glass may speak to you. My studio mate was very excited by it and is planning to buy at least 3 pounds. Me, not so much. Arctic Milky and Misty are shown here as sculpted flowers, a hollow heart and as a spacer bead.”
Janet Evans
"My favorite thing about testing new colors are the little surprises! Both Arctic Misty & Milky reminded me of a beautiful gemstone shade of aqua blue. The more I worked with the Misty version the darker and more green it became. I worked these two colors in a cooler, oxidising flame and had no issues with boiling or shockiness."
Michelle Veizaga
"I thought it was me but noticed others had the same results. First I thought maybe a little too much propane but then increased oxygen and got the same thing. Small beads showed a consistent colour. Longer times did make the glass go more muddy green."
Jean Daniels
"I have no idea what happened here! The Arctic Misty rod is a beautiful ice blue, but my Totoro ended up a deep swampy brown [far right]. Not a fan."
Bling Squared Cute Glass
"These beads are both Effetre super clear encased with Arctic Misty, then with added clear petals. Both worked one after the other. On the greener one I can see hints of the darker hue if I look closely. I don’t work hot and never had this happen before. They both went in the kiln paler. The only thing I put it down to was the clear for the petals went on maybe too hot causing that reaction. Interesting."
Juliette Mullett
"Wow, this glass was weird. In rod, it is a pale blue-green. When melted, it ranges from that pale blue-green to a much deeper moss green. You can see in the single color spacers that it doesn't take much heat to have it turn mossy. Truly a unique glass, indeed."
Lori Peterson
"Arctic Misty was intended to be the misty opal version of CiM Frost. I don’t see the family resemblance I’m afraid. Frost is such a pure ice blue colour and Arctic reminds me of stormy seas."
Bianca Gruber
"Arctic Misty [top] and Milky [bottom]. It was going along fine with the misty, and just as I was about to put it in the kiln, I noticed that the body looked scorched. I have no idea what happened. I don't know if this was me or something that this color does. The milky version was no problem."
Dwyn Tomlinson
"Arctic Misty melted on the murky greeny blue side whereas Milky was a cleaner pretty opal aquamarine. A slight colour shift occurred [more so to Misty] after kiln annealing. They both melted fine in the flame and not shocky at all."
Bianca Gruber
“I made a sculptural bird bead with Arctic Misty. At first, the color seemed fine, but by the time the bird was completed it had turned to a dark transparent olive grey. Not sure what the issue is there. I began with a clear ‘core’ body and then encased in Arctic Misty. This gives an opportunity to see encasement with the color. The head, wings and tail were added straight from the rod. I used Reichenbach Deep Black for the base of the beak followed by Effetre Pastel Yellow. The eyes were also Reichenbach Deep Black.”
Kim Fields
"I was doing sculptural work, that glass only on each bead. I had been in the flame for about 20 minutes, manipulating it, when it looked like parts of Arctic might have turned brownish - not deep brown, but much lighter. I tried 'unstriking' it- heating it up really hot will sometimes reset the color. It didn't work. I could still see some of the Arctic, but it also looked like it had some of the light brown color in it. So this morning, I opened the kiln and the bead was black. Big surprise. It was black all over, too, which was interesting, because it didn't look like the brown extended for all of it when testing."
Marcy Lamberson
"Arctic Misty looks to be a pale opal blue shade in rod form. When I opened the kiln I was very surprised to find these lovely warm grey hearts. As before, the misty version of this glass has more translucence [white dots] but also I find that Arctic milky looks more pastel than its misty counterpart." See more at Kitzbitz Art Glass' blog.
Jolene Wolfe
"Arctic Misty is a trip!! I expected it to look like a bluer version of Peacock Green and that it would also play nicely with silvered ivory. Nope!!! The longer I worked it the more opaque and 'grey' it turned . . . my samples turned a solid grey black color . . . so I don't know if it's a heat issue or a chemistry reaction to a core of silvered ivory. There were no incompatibility cracks, so at least there's that. I've never had such a dramatic change in color other than maybe Ghee."
Joy Munshower
"Arctic Misty surprised me the most. Doesn’t look the same at all after annealing." Left to right: Arctic Milky, Arctic Misty.
Claudia Eidenbenz